26
Aug
10

“Tramlines Festival” 2010 Picture Special.

Tramlines 2010

Tramlines 2010

By Jonathan Bradwell

Sunshine and Music are two components that serve conjointly. If one blunders, to still pull off a music festival the other must anabasis. Sheffield’s “Tramlines Festival” may have only been beautified with the infrequent moderate intermission of heat, but the weekend’s performances, both on the main stages and in the more sequester venues, were marvellous. Running over the weekend of the 23rd, 24th and 25th of July, the festival directorates decided to make all admissions free this year, deciding instead to convey the musical parade on a first come first serve axiom. In the emblematic and champion “Tramlines” style the event did not clinker itself to one particular set of venues, but instead made use of an astronomical variety of halls, stages and clubs throughout the Steel City to display the monstrous amount of varied music: Everything from traditional continental pieces to the filthiest of Dub Step was whorled around the gutters of this chosen Yorkshire inhabitancy. You read the reviews, dissertated which acts were unsurpassed and should be billed again, but now it’s time to take a second to re-live the adventure with a selection of photographs corralled at the weekend… Permit the recollections to commence…

“Blood Red Shoes”: Voyaging from Brighton, “Blood Red Shoes” utilized their radio friendly Rock Pop through the medium of the “New Music Stage” on the second day of the operations. Fronted by ‘Laura – Mary Carter’ (Guitars and Vocals), “Blood Red Shoes” are a no palaver, no fancy trimmings rock outfit, in which ‘Steven Ansell’ subsists as the second half of the duet on the drums. After only six years “Blood Red Shoes” released two complete studio albums and a mountainous twelve Singles, of which two of these songs made it to top the top 100 UK singles charts at the time. There felicitous traditional approach to crispy rock tides seems almost too effectuate to be wielded by just two figures. The pictures at the bottom of the [age tagged with “BRS” are from there performance.

“Chapel Club”: Not divagating far from the manor of “The Smiths”, meaning isochronal drifts to the sounds of bands out of this generation, “Chapel Club” have harvested a loyal fan base as their music becomes submerged further in praise by today’s media. The band are enriching the ‘Emerge NME’ tour later this year with their lyrically laden cumbrous gravity. At “Tramlines” they were one of many acts honoured with being able to tread aboard the “New Music Stage” on which a distended variety of acts were included in. In a time of racy music, it makes a change to hear something more retained. “Chapel Club” are a band to keep an eye out for, as majestically seven BBC presenters have been apprehended to play their music. The photographs at the end of this article tagged with “CC” are of the “Chapel Club” at Tramlines Festival.
“Professor Green”: Anyone garnering a radio unquestionably has experienced the fetching chorus to breathtaking pop remake “Just be good to Green”. It fronts ‘Lilly Allen’s’ sweet voice echoing her please of “I don’t care what you do to them, just be good to me”. ‘Professor Green’ has that street dissimilitude and esteemed reputation that has impelled his name to one of the more reputable slots on the Tramlines Bill: A headliner on the bombinating ‘Devonshire Green’. With a second studio album in agrology for 2011, this modern day artist has exhilaratingly transfused the inimitable melodies of pop and regnant measures of rap into one irrepressible body. Taking to the stage after pop legend ‘Craig David’ however is no brisk and elementary task! Pictures of the evening’s performance have been labelled “PrG”.
From just a hand full of photographs its averment that “Tramlines Festival” was an incandescent weekend taking place in a cultural city the inhabitants are fond of. The festival was not only recompensing for music devotees, who were bestowed a cheap thrills weekend. No, Sheffield itself will have profited both in terms of being substantiated as a prerequisite homeplate for music. In a ‘Sheffield Telegraph’ article Councillor ‘Paul Scraven’, Liberal Democrat Leader in the Sheffield city council, reported there may be some pecuniary accruals: “There truly was something for everybody right throughout the city centre and the feedback I have had from local people has been outstanding.  … In total around 125,000 people visited the city centre for Tramlines. If each person spent £20 in local bars, restaurants or hotels then that’s £2.5m directly into our local economy. ”. High anticipations are being built up and demanded already for next year, but if anyone can remit as much nimbleness and fruition at a live music event, it’s inexorably going to be the facilitators of this jubilee.
(Head picture courtesy of “Never Enough Notes”)
Video of a compilation of events from the Friday night at “Tramlines Festival”. Does not include the artists wrote about above:

(Pictures below are courtesy of ‘Laura Dunraven’)
BRS

BRS

BRS

BRS

BRS

BRS

BRS

BRS

CC

CC

CC

CC

CC

CC

 CC

CC

PrG

PrG

PrG

PrG

PrG

PrG

PrG

PrG

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